Research
Current Projects

Current Research Projects at the Institute of Assembly Technology

Developing and Optimising of Handling and Assembly Processes

  • Precision Assembly
    Whether sensors, pacemakers or watch movements: wherever parts have to be assembled very precisely, conventional robots and corresponding peripherals reach their limits. In this area, match is investigating new solutions and strategies to implement reliable and economical precision assembly processes.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Martin Stucki, Rolf Wiemann, Niklas Terei, Lars Binnemann
    Year: 2018
    Funding: basic funding
  • Handling of Hot-Forged Hybrid Components in the Process of Tailored Forming
    The CRC 1153 "Tailored Forming" aims to exploit the potential of hybrid solid components based on a novel process chain and to develop the required manufacturing processes. The match focuses on the development of functional modules for form-variable and function-integrated handling of components with temperatures up to 1250 °C.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Caner Ince
    Year: 2019
    Funding: DFG
  • PhoenixD
    The PhoenixD Cluster of Excellence brings together various specialist domains from optical design, optical simulation and optical production with the aim of developing intelligent, integrated and adaptive optical systems. In this project, match takes on precision assembly tasks and focuses more intensively on fully process-integrated component alignment via self-assembly and the development of innovative, self-optimising assembly concepts.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Martin Stucki, Rolf Wiemann, Niklas Terei, Lars Binnemann
    Year: 2019
    Funding: DFG
  • Self-Assembly
    This research area is concerned with the development of self-assembling or self-positioning systems. The specific design creates energetic potentials that effect the components and thus pull them to the assembly position. Handling of the individual components is no longer necessary, which enables new applications, such as non-contact assembly.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Martin Stucki
    Year: 2019
    Funding: DFG (PhoenixD)
  • CRC 1368: adhesive-based assembly processes in XHV-adequate atmospheres
    As part of the Collaborative Research Center 1368 "Oxygen-free production", the match deals with adhesive-based assembly technology in a technically oxygen-free atmosphere. The aim of the sub-project is to gain knowledge about the technical properties of bonded joints produced in an oxygen-free atmosphere and with deoxidized joining partners.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Prof. Wolfgang Maus-Friedrichs, Sandra Gerland, Rolf Wiemann
    Year: 2020
    Funding: DFG
  • Assembly of photonic integrated circuits
    The Cluster of Excellence PhoenixD pursues the goal of integrating conventional and complex high-performance optics into intelligent, miniaturised and adaptive optical systems. In this context, match is researching novel concepts and processes for the micro-assembly of optical systems.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Niklas Terei
    Year: 2021
    Funding: DFG (PhoenixD)
  • Assembly station based on a magnetic levitation system
    To achieve a cost efficient production of optical components or photonic integrated circuits, PhoenixD is following the approach of implementing an production matrix based on a levitated transport system. The goal is to use the mover not only for the transport between stations, but also as a functional unit during the stations.Therefor the match investigates and develops an integrated assembly station.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Lars Binnemann
    Year: 2021
    Funding: DFG (PhoenixD)
    Duration: 4 Jahre
  • Strategies for piezo actuator-assisted disassembly of bolted joints
    The Collaborative Research Center (SFB) 871 "Regeneration of Complex Capital Goods" has been researching the scientific principles of regeneration since 2010, using civil aircraft engines as an example. The motivation is how complex components can be efficiently maintained and repaired in a resource-friendly way. The match focuses in the transfer project T16 on and develops novel strategies for gentle disassembly using the example of bolted joints.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Richard Blümel
    Year: 2023
    Funding: DFG
    Duration: 2,5 Years

Machine Concepts and System Integration

  • Underactuated handling systems
    Within the field of "underactuated handling systems" assembly systems with fewer actuators than degrees of freedom are being researched. The basic idea is to reduce the design effort and avoid the costs of actuated systems, where each degree of freedom is typically linked to a separate motor. The main topics are the structural synthesis of the orientation mechanism and the control of the highly nonlinear dynamics.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Tobias Recker
    Year: 2017
  • Aerodynamic part feeding
    Modern production systems are subject to a variety of requirements. On the one hand, there is high cost pressure, as a result of which a high degree of automation is usually sought, particularly in high-wage countries. On the other hand, production is confronted with an increasing number of variants and greater planning uncertainty due to globalized markets, which necessitates a high degree of flexibility in the operating resources used. Particularly in assembly, which represents a central subarea of production, flexible automation solutions must consequently be developed that enable dynamic adaptation to changed boundary conditions.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Torge Kolditz
    Year: 2022
  • IT security in the deployment of 5G in production ecosystems (5GProSec)
    The goal of the research project is therefore to systematically record and eliminate possible attack vectors and unintentional disruptions in the use of 5G, especially in production, in order to lower hurdles for the use of 5G in companies and eliminate security concerns.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Henrik Lurz
    Year: 2023
    Funding: BSI
  • CRC 1153: Flexible process chain for the resource-efficient production of tailored forming components
    Within the framework of the Collaborative Research Centre (CRC) 1153, novel design, joining, forming, finishing and testing processes for the production of hybrid solid high-performance components were developed and realised in the first two funding periods. Within the third funding period, the individual processes in this sub-project will be linked to form an automated overall process in order to validate the functionality of the processes in a continuous process chain and to provide reproducible samples for the individual sub-projects.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Sebastian Blankemeyer
    Year: 2023
    Funding: DFG
    Duration: 2023-2027

Robot aided Assembly and Handling Processes

  • Collaborative Assembly of Human and Machine
    In the process chain, assembly represents the last step of value creation and thus plays an crucial role in the production process of companies. The high cost and time-consuming processes involved in the assembly indicate that there is considerable potential for rationalization, from the planning and preparation of the assembly to the execution of the assembly. In addition, companies are looking for solutions to address problems resulting from an aging workforce and an increasing demand for skilled workers. For this reason, match develops collaborative assembly systems and processes.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Sebastian Blankemeyer
    Year: 2015
  • Robot-assisted cooperative handling and assembly
    The handling and assembly of compliant and large-scale components is an important step in the process chain, especially with regard to fiber composite production. The problems that can occur when handling flexible components are their shape changes, which can lead to an undefined placement position. Furthermore, grasping with conventional grippers is often not possible.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Sebastian Blankemeyer
    Year: 2015
  • Autonomous Mobile Robotics
    In the assembly and manufacturing of large-format products and systems, very large and complex handling and assembly devices are used, which can only be set up and operated at one central production site due to their size and complexity. The finished products and systems have to be disassembled and transported to their destination, where they are reassembled. In the future, autonomous mobile robots will be used to assemble or manufacture these large-format machines directly at their destination. This will involve the cooperation of several different mobile robots in various sizes.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Tobias Recker, Henrik Lurz
    Year: 2018
  • TRR 277 Additive Manufacturing in Construction
    While productivity in the manufacturing industry increased linearly in most areas, this value has stagnated in the construction industry for about 50 years. The reason for this is the high manual effort required to create complex formwork elements. The aim of TRR 277 is to avoid this by using additive manufacturing processes. An interdisciplinary approach is being pursued, taking into account planning, production and assembly, in order to provide concrete elements that meet future requirements without formwork and more comple geometries in a way that saves energy and resources.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Lukas Lachmayer
    Year: 2020
    Funding: DFG
  • Digital planning and automated production of buildingintegrated photovoltaics (DIGI-PV)
    The goal of the DIGI-PV project is to reduce barriers to the large-scale use of PV technology in order to open up significantly more façade areas for energy use. The focus here is on existing buildings. The challenges here are currently the complex planning processes for the BIPV façade and the non-automated and therefore cost-intensive production of BIPV modules. For this purpose, automated processes and tools are being developed that enable planners, producers and users to implement efficient and cost-effective processes and support them along several phases of the product life cycle.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Sebastian Blankemeyer, Jessica Schönburg
    Year: 2023
    Funding: BMWK

Soft Material Robotic Systems

  • Coherent Methodology for Modelling and Design of Soft Material Robots – The Soft Material Robotics Toolbox (SMaRT)
    In the project SMaRT ("Soft Material Robotics Toolbox"), match is conducting research together with the Institute for Mechatronic Systems (imes) and the Institute for Dynamics and Vibrations (IDS) on a coherent methodology for modeling and designing soft material robots.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Mats Wiese
    Year: 2019
    Funding: DFG
  • Soft Material Robotic Systems
    In the research area of Soft Material Robotic Systems (SMRS) we deal with robot structures made of soft and flexible materials, which - in contrast to their counterparts made of hard materials such as steel or aluminium - are inherently safe in direct contact with humans. SMRS are for example predestined for use in collaborative assembly systems, where humans and robots move and interact in the same workspace.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Ditzia Susana Garcia Morales, Mats Wiese, Jan Peters, Cora Maria Sourkounis
    Year: 2019
    Funding: DFG Priority Programme
  • Active Suction Device for Deep-Sea Applications (ASDDSA)
    Together with GEOMAR, the match is researching the development of a soft robotic system that can be used in the deep sea for sampling flora, fauna and rocks.
    Team: Prof. Annika Raatz, Jan Peters, Cora Maria Sourkounis
    Year: 2022
    Funding: DFG